Educational and Training Kits Market: An Industry Perspective

By Ayushee Sharma

0
368
Advertisement

With automation, repetitive tasks have started becoming obsolete. To remain relevant in the industry in the coming years, developing new-age skills in areas like artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics and cloud computing is mandatory.

The field of technology is expanding at an exponential rate in today’s world. We are in the middle of Industry 4.0, and fields such as electronics are playing a major role in this revolution. In a country like India, which has more than fifty per cent of its population below the age of 25 and approximately 3500 engineering colleges, there are a number of opportunities for growth.

The problem is that India has vast resources but low workforce skills, especially when it comes to modern technologies. According to National Employability Report Engineers, 2019 by Aspiring Minds, employability of Indian engineers continues to be low, with more than eighty per cent of engineers unemployable for any job in the knowledge economy.

Advertisement

Analysing the situation, Dr R.V. Dhekale, managing director, Perfect Electronics, says, “It is necessary to give prime importance to electronics practicals in science and engineering colleges. At present, theory lectures are more as compared to practical hours in departments of electronics, physics, IT, etc. If equal theory hours and practical hours are given for science and engineering colleges, students will get inspired to do research to do something new in the sector. Unfortunately, that does not happen.”

With automation, repetitive tasks have started becoming obsolete. To remain relevant in the industry in the coming years, developing new-age skills in areas like artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics and cloud computing is mandatory. For instance, talking about robotics, Hetal Vira, managing director, Hi-Technology, says, “A lack of skilled talent in key design and engineering areas is also hindering Indian robotics growth. Other challenges include a limited investor base and a small domestic market for robotics in India. Cost of adopting robotic technology is very high due to the cost of procuring imported hardware components as well as training personnel.”

Market growth catalysts

As the demand for STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills in the job sector increases, there is a need for introducing these to coming generations with educational programmes and DIY activities right from school days. Several companies are coming up with educational toys to make learning fun. Parents and educators must come together to ensure its success. Dr Pravin Raut, founder and managing director, SINCOM Sindhu Electronics and Communications Pvt Ltd, says, “Looking at the role of electronic gadgets in our day-to-day life, it is now becoming necessary to learn the gems of electronics from school days, instead of college. With this motto, SINCOM-Training Division conducts various modules of Electronics Workshop to provide hands-on training, especially for school students. The objective of this workshop is to develop students’ interest in the electronics field so that they acquire basic skills in electronic devices from childhood and become smart kids.”

 Primary school students during Ellicott STEM Night in Colorado, USA
Primary school students during Ellicott STEM Night in Colorado, USA
Advertisement

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS & COMMENTS

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Are you human? *